MentalHealthRightsYES - for Mental Health Rights
 
 




winner of 2010 best investigative book

Investigative journalist and author of
Anatomy of an Epidemic

RETURNING TO THE NORTHWEST IN MAY TO MULTIPLE SITES:
VANCOUVER BC, SEATTLE, TACOMA, OLYMPIA, VANCOUVER WA, PORTLAND


Portland, Oregon
Friday, May 13, and Saturday May 14
First Unitarian Church 

Contact: Marsha   at 503-665-3957

…Then I investigated how psychiatric medications affect the long-term course of four major mental
disorders (schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, and bipolar illness),
 and that involved doing an exhaustive survey of studies conducted (or funded) by the
National Institute of Mental Health,
                               the World Health Organization,
                                                          and foreign governments
                                                                             for the   past 50 years.
 
In the last chapter of my book Anatomy of an Epidemic, I noted that if our
society is going to stem the epidemic of disabling mental illness that has erupted
during the past twenty years, then it needs to have an honest discussion about
what is truly known about the biological causes of psychiatric disorders, and an
honest discussion about how the medications affect the long-term course of
those disorders… 
There is a fairly long line of studies dating back to the 1960s that bear on this question, and the conclusion to be drawn is this: 
If psychiatry wants to maximize longterm outcomes, it needs to use antipsychotic medications in a selective, limited manner. Time and time again, the studies showed that there is a large subgroup of  patients that would fare better 
 
if they were never put on the drugs in the first place, 
or if they were maintained on the drugs for only a short while.
 
 
 
                                      
“Western Lapland, in northern Finland, started using antipsychotic medications in this manner in 1992, and today their psychotic patients enjoy the best long-term outcomes in the western world.”
“ Five years after the first psychotic episode, 80% of their patients are either back in school or working.” (see link on side to Dr. Seikulu or open dialogue)
 
 

&
 
                               MentalHealthRightsYES.org  contact  Cindi 360-693-9307 (Vancouver)
Recovery in Her/His Hands
With Full human Rights and Dignity
Supported and Empowered by Community
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 

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